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Table 5 Infertility around the world a , [12] reported from previous studies examining male infertility to summarize previous research

From: A unique view on male infertility around the globe

  Population Author, year Female factor Male factor Combination
French Regions (1988-1989) 1686 Couples Thonneau et al. 1991 [13] 30% 20% 39%
Western Siberia 2000 Married women; 186 couples Philippov et al. 1998 [27] 52.70% 6.40% 38.70%
Southeastern Nigeria 314 couples Ikechebelu et al. 2003 [19] 25.80% 42.40% 20.70%
Mongolia 430 Couples Bayasgalan et al. 2004 [28] 45.80% 25.60% 18.80%
Poland/Eastern Europe Unreported Sanocka and Kurpisz 2003 [14]; Bablok et al. 2011 [6] Unreported 40-60%b [14]; 56% [6] Unreported
Egypt 190 Women Inhorn, Buss 1994 [7] 82% 13%c; 46%d [7] Unreported
Yazd Province of Iran 5200 Couples Aflatoonian et al. 2009 [8] 57.5% 25.3% [8] 8%
Sudan 710 couples Elussein et al. 2008 [9] 49.3% 36.2% [9] Unreported
  1. aTable has been adapted from Winters and Walsh [12].
  2. bThis number was from Sanocka et al., which stated that 20% of couples are infertile, and 40-60% of those cases are due to male factor infertility [6]. This calculation amounts to 8-12% of men overall are the reason for these infertility cases.
  3. cIn Inhorn and Buss, in 11/87 (13%) of evaluated cases, male factor infertility was the sole cause of infertility [13].
  4. dIn Inhorn and Buss, in 40/87 (46%) of cases, male factor was involved [13].